Tag Archives: Lykins

Isaac McCoy

Isaac McCoy
b. 13 June 1784, Uniontown, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, to William H. and Elizabeth (Rice) McCoy
d. 21 June 1846, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

m. 6 October 1803, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky
Christiana Polk
b. 12 November 1784, Nelson County, Kentucky, to Charles and Delilah (Tyler) Polk
d. 6 August 1850, Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri

Children with Christiana Polk:
• Mahala (1804-1818)
• Rice (1807-1833)
• Josephus (1808-1831)
• Delilah (1809-1844) married Johnston Lykins
• John Calvin (1811-1889) married (1) Virginia Chick, (2) Elizabeth Woodson
• Elizabeth (1813-1822)
• Sarah (1815-1835) married (1) Thomas Jefferson Givens, (2) Thomas Gilens
• Christiana (1817-1837) married William Ward
• Nancy Judson (1819-1850)
• Eleanor (1821-1839) married Husband Dononue
• Maria Staunton (1823-1824)
• Isaac (1825-1849) married Martha Stone
• Charles Rice (1827-1831)
• infant (1831)

The family moved to near Sellersburg, Clark County, in the Indiana Territory in 1804. Later, they moved to Vincennes, Knox County, where Isaac was a spinning wheel maker and a jailer. In 1805, they moved back to Clark County, where he was licensed as a Baptist minister. Isaac served at Mariah Creek Church in Knox County, starting in October 1810. In 1818, he established an Indian mission north of Terre Haute near Montezuma on Raccoon Creek in Parke County. In 1820 he went to Fort Wayne in Allen County to establish a church for Indians; Christiana had a school that taught spinning and weaving. In 1828, Isaac was appointed a member of the commission to arrange the removal of Indians to reservations in Kansas. He and two sons moved to the Kansas City, Missouri area. In 1843, Isaac returned to Indiana where he was appointed Secretary and General Agent for the Indiana Mission Association of Louisville, Kentucky.

Isaac wrote a book on the white man’s attempt to Christianize the Indians in 1840. A memorial book Early Indian Missions by W.N. Wyeth tells of the lives and mission work of Rev. and Mrs. McCoy. Many of his writings are in the Isaac McCoy Collection of the Kansas Historical Society. The towns of Niles and Grand Rapids, Michigan were originally McCoy Indian Missions.

Submitted by:
Christie Hill Russell
Paris IL
E-mail: christie@cartar.com

Samuel Lewis Cooksey

Samuel Lewis Cooksey
b. 6 June 1859, Owen County, Indiana, to John Wyatt and Mahulda Mahoney (Ellis/Allis) Cooksey
d. 9 July 1928, Hume, Douglas County, Illinois

m. 6 June 1883, Vandalia, Owen County, Indiana
Mary Cynthia Criss
b. 7 December 1867, Vandalia, Owen County, Indiana, to Henry and Juliette Frances (Roberts) Criss
d. 10 September 1944, Danville, Vermilion County, Illinois

Children with Mary Cynthia Criss:

  • Homer Wyatt (1883-1954) married Pearl Thompson
  • Ann Rosella (1890-1982) married Elmer Shunk
  • William Roy (twin, 1896-1958) married Delorus Daugherty
  • Lewis Ray (twin, 1896-1958) married Gertrude Kewitt
  • Gertrude Elizabeth (1897-1977) married (1) Elbert Blaisdell, (2) Edward Lykins
  • Alva Dow (1899-1938) married Virgie Jewel Pate
  • Edith Ethel (1901-1985) married Vance Baxter

In 1832, Vincent Cooksey, his wife Sarah Simpkins, and their infant son John Wyatt came to Owen County, Indiana from Montgomery County, Virginia. John Wyatt’s son, Samuel Lewis, was born in Owen County, Indiana in 1859. About 1915, Samuel, wife Mary Cynthia Criss, and family moved to Newman, Douglas County, Illinois.

Samuel and two of his sisters were students at the Indiana School for the Blind, where Samuel learned the trade of making brooms. In Owen County, he was township supervisor, farmed, and made brooms. Alva Dow couldn’t understand why his father could give complete strangers money to buy children’s shoes, but couldn’t always buy shoes for his own children.

At Newman, Illinois, three of the grown sons did the farming, the daughters did the housework, and Mary Cynthia looked after Samuel. In the early 1920’s Samuel bought a new automobile for the family and suggested that he give it the gas while his son steered!

Submitted by:
Dow Junior Cooksey
Danville IL
E-mail: dcooksey@insightbb.com

Mary Cynthia Criss

Mary Cynthia Criss
b. 7 December 1867, Vandalia, Owen County, Indiana, to Henry and Juliette Frances (Roberts) Cross
d. 10 September 1944, Danville, Vermillion County, Illinois

m. 6 June 1883, Vandalia, Owen County, Indiana
Samuel Lewis Cooksey
b. 6 June 1859, Owen County, Indiana, to John Wyatt and Mahulda Mahoney (Ellis/Allis)
Cooksey
d. 9 July 1928, Hume, Douglas County, Illinois

Children with Samuel Lewis Cooksey:

  • Homer Wyatt (1883-1954) married Pearl Thompson
  • Ann Rosella (1890-1982) married Elmer Sunk
  • William Roy (twin, 1896-1958) married Delorus Daugherty
  • Lewis Ray (twin, 1896-1958) married Gertrude Kewitt
  • Gertrude Elizabeth (1897-1977) married (1) Elbert Blaisdell, (2) Edward Lykins
  • Alva Dow (1899-1938) married Virgie Jewel Pate
  • Edith Ethel (1901-1985) married Vance Baxter

Sarah Criss, her son William Cross and his son, Henry Criss, came to Owen County, Indiana from Carroll County, Ohio, in 1935. They settled at Vandalia, Owen County, Indiana. Sarah and her son William are both buried in the Vandalia Methodist Cemetery and Henry is in the Palestine Cemetery in Vandalia. Henry’s daughter Mary Cynthia was born near Vandalia, Indiana. About 1915, Mary and her husband Samuel Cooksey moved to Newman, Douglas County, Illinois. Mary looked after her blind husband’s business affairs, while her daughters did the housework and the sons did the farming.

Submitted by:
Dow Junior Cooksey
Danville IL
E-mail: dcooksey@insightbb.com